dewline: (canadian media)
I was going to explore my reactions to Star Trek: Discovery(AKA "DSC") in greater depth, and you may expect that later in this entry. For the moment, a surprising bit of news from closer to home arrived this morning: Rick Mercer's announcement that the Mercer Report will be closing up shop at the end of what will be its fifteenth season CBC Television.

Allow me to share his announcement via his own recording...



I admit that I see this as another sign of something akin to a Canadian Apocalypse. Some of you who've been watching this weblog for a while will be making informed deductions and/or guesses as to what some of the other signs are.

I'm not happy. But it's Rick's choice to make. Not mine. Not CBC's.

Okay, on to DSC.

What we ended up getting on Sunday night, after delays thanks to CBS' contractual obligations to the NFL impacting on BellMedia's obligations to CBS, was the first two episodes of DSC. Aired back to back, with "The Vulcan Hello" followed immediately by "Battle at the Binary Stars". Together they form what you might call either a prologue or a full Act One of the first season's larger story.

Without giving away too much, it's a good setup for whatever else we're about to get this year.

I'm still getting over my bout of design history dissonance considering this is supposed to be happening about a year after the events of "The Cage" and ten years before "Where No Man Has Gone Before". The uniforms, the user interface designs, the starship architecture...all seem a bit out of place with those two episodes of the original series. We're being promised explanations and evolution over time, to be sure. How fast the production team delivers is up to them. Our reactions to that speed - or the lack of it - are up to us.

Just about everything else: the scripts, the performances of the live actors, the visual effects work...all meet my hopes.

That visual dissonance remains. For now, anyway.

One bit of advice to CBS and its production partners: please show the episode titles in the episode itself.
dewline: (Default)
"Hotumn" continues in Ottawa-Gatineau. Sweat from scalp to soles is normal-abnormal right now. Sleep continues to be a luxury item by virtue of being a medical necessity.

The Invictus Games are underway in Toronto, as are the German elections, the continuing weather/climate turmoil in the Caribbean Islands, the post-quake trauma in several regions of Mexico...and on it goes. This world continues to be a busy place, defying anyone's ability to fully understand it at any one moment. I can still live with that.

The Big Event for me as a science fiction fan tonight is Star Trek: Discovery's opening episode, "The Vulcan Hello". I can't say that I'm pleased with the idea of the series being available by subscription-streaming over the Net everywhere else on the planet, but at least Canada's managed to avoid that for now via Space Channel.

Also, I'm still getting used to this being the first Trek branch-series filmed on soundstages outside the USA. In Toronto, of all places. Just over four hours away from me by passenger train. This wasn't a thing I'd ever really expected to happen. Sure, I'd imagined branch series created for every language in which Trek is watched these days in the places where those languages were most presently in use. Which was probably less than practical, even nowadays.

Not sure yet about the design aesthetics of the series, but we'll see how it goes. Looking forward to those maps they've been talking about in Lorca's ready room...
dewline: (Default)
On fictional user interface design for film and TV:

http://www.idnworld.com/imprints/FUI-DesignFilmGames

On Brexit's campaign against anti-corruption efforts (and yes, I wrote that as intended):

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/19/opinion/brexit-britain-corruption.html
dewline: (Default)
Still. Not. Normal.
dewline: (Default)
I rewatched Atomic Blonde on Friday night. It made a bit more sense on the second viewing, which was good. It's not only a whodunnit, but a how- and why- as well as being a period spy/action drama. Not sure that we need a sequel to it, but that's an argument we can have in the comments.
dewline: (Weapons)
Okay, some progress here. Shawn Micallef's Frontier City: Toronto on the Verge of Greatness is done. It's a snapshot of his perceptions of recent Toronto history, particularly in the wake of the Ford years. The phrase "too soon to tell" sticks in the mind where his opinion is concerned.

Hidden Universe: the Klingon Empire by Dayton Ward takes the travel guide idea and applies it to...well, mostly Qo'noS. The Empire's a big place, as he notes himself (and perhaps larger than the text implies), but it does focus mainly on the homeworld.

By accident, I discovered Hope in the Dark by Rebecca Solnit. You've read mentions of her work pulling together historical atlases on New York, San Francisco and New Orleans here in this weblog over the years, and this book is a collection of her essays reminding us that hope is a realistic option even in horrific times. Originally published in 2004, it was revised and reprinted as yet another consequence of DT-45's election to the American presidency.

Still trying to make time for The Revenge of Analog by David Sax.
dewline: (comic books)
I watched this last night. Seemed like it has something helpful to say on the subject of that particular mix of envy and sadness you can sometimes feel when seeing work you consider better than your own...and I've been in that emotional state more than once across the decades.

dewline: (public broadcasting)
People who live in or declare allegiance to what I call Canada are a mixture of people who come from all sorts of different places, different ways of thinking. From people who insist they're not Canadian because their allegiance is to a nation that pre-dates European contact to people who see themselves as Canadian no matter where else on Earth they may live and work...this was a collection of stories that filled me with joy, sadness, fear, hope...and wonder above all else.

http://www.cbc.ca/radio/outintheopen/hyphen-state-1.4184855
dewline: (Default)
I have to wonder if - with today's installment of Candorville - Lemont (and series author Darrin Bell) isn't being a tad too optimistic with panel five about the indigenous peoples of North America if the American Revolution hadn't come off as it did in reality. We'd still have people who thought like Sir John A. Macdonald and Duncan Campbell Scott and Philip Sheridan did, although the specific people in power enforcing such atrocities as settlers' law would likely be different.

As for the rest of it?
dewline: (Default)
As a past courtroom artist, I find this article on Poynter.org more than a tad intriguing. I know that journalism in general is facing some challenging times (in positive and negative ways) and yet - perhaps because of several of my favourite fictional characters - I've long felt an affinity to that profession, whatever I'm actually doing to pay my bills at the time...
dewline: (public broadcasting)
I'm feeling in more of a contemplative mood rather than a celebratory one today. No interest in going to Parliament Hill to endure the weather, the crowds and the security theatre at all, for one thing. For another, there's the ongoing concerns of the indigenous peoples about the consequences of how Confederation got built, upon whose bones and so on.

We are still not yet the nation we could become, and it behooves us all to remember that fact.

Leaving it at that for now. I don't know if I'll have anything more worth saying right now...
dewline: (Books)
...that I just finished up the DS9 novel Enigma Tales by Una McCormack. Garak and Pulaski crossing paths, and...occasionally, metaphorical swords as well. Worth a few hours and a few dollars, I'd say.
dewline: (Default)
Saw Wonder Woman today. Good movie.

The one minor annoyance? Seeing the current-as-of-today US Treasury Secretary's name listed as an "executive producer" in the end credits (but not the main-on-end credits).
dewline: (journalism)
As far as the Qatar blockade goes, I think we all know the real target: Al Jazeera.

Tony Burman lays out that case:

https://www.thestar.com/news/world/2017/06/17/gulf-blockade-target-isnt-qatar-its-al-jazeera-burman.html
dewline: (space exploration)
I finally finished my first read-through this weekend, by the by. Seems like the scale of the story keeps steadily escalating with each volume, which I have no complaints about.

One other thing I notice towards the end is how the unintended consequences for economies in the process of scaling up can pile up PDQ...
dewline: (Default)
1. The seventh game of the playoff series between the Ottawa Senators and Pittsburgh Penguins starts tonight shortly after 8 PM EST.

2. Today is the 40th anniversary of the launch of Star Wars (Episode IV: A New Hope) at the movie theatres.

The phrase "Do, or do not. There is no 'try'" comes to mind, and I expect I'm not alone in that.
dewline: (comic books)
You know how for years, people wanted Kevin Conroy and Mark Hamill play out the dialogue of The Killing Joke, and eventually we got that direct-to-video movie out of that desire of the audience?

Well, there's the first ten(?) pages of Jessica Jones # 8 from Marvel this past month. Two characters, Jones herself and Maria Hill, in Jessica's bathroom. Spoiler-free as I can make it, it's a combination plot-infodump, airing of grievances, confessionals, and contract negotiations between the two characters.

I would like to see/hear Krysten Ritter and Cobie Smulders play out that scene in character.
dewline: (Default)
One: tonight's Doctor Who is an argument for labour unions if ever I've watched it.

Two: pleased by the Sens' game one results.

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On the DEWLine 2.0: Dwight Williams

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