Milestones

Jul. 16th, 2017 05:29 pm
dewline: (Default)
George Romero is dead.

Martin Landau is dead.

The first woman to play the Doctor has been introduced as such to the worlds.

Seems like a day for milestones in science fiction and fantasy, yes?
dewline: (canadian media)
Some of you may have already seen other installments of the "Rare Earth" series of videos, but this one is of particular interest to me. It starts in one sense with Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in another with a fishing vessel that met its doom in 1954 despite returning to port intact...

dewline: (public broadcasting)
I'm feeling in more of a contemplative mood rather than a celebratory one today. No interest in going to Parliament Hill to endure the weather, the crowds and the security theatre at all, for one thing. For another, there's the ongoing concerns of the indigenous peoples about the consequences of how Confederation got built, upon whose bones and so on.

We are still not yet the nation we could become, and it behooves us all to remember that fact.

Leaving it at that for now. I don't know if I'll have anything more worth saying right now...
dewline: (public broadcasting)
Some of you regular readers already know of my work with Spacing Ottawa documenting the backstories of the street names of Ottawa. CBC's got an installment of Cross-Country Checkup on Radio One this upcoming Sunday that we will all want to listen to.

http://www.cbc.ca/radio/checkup/should-canada-change-the-names-of-streets-and-monuments-that-honour-contentious-figures-1.4049368
dewline: (Default)
I would argue that at least two of our politicians at the federal level in Canada are among many people worthy of our attention and respect for coping with hard situations, even if/when we watch them in the midst of coping with errors strategic and/or tactical.

Ahmed Hussen is our current minister for Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship. Erin Andersson and Michelle Zilio filed a piece with the Globe and Mail that gives us a sense of his progress, from Somali refugee to federal cabinet minister.

Chrystia Freeland went from reporter to minister for Global Affairs and International Trade. Being of Ukrainian ancestry and opposed to Russian interventions in her family's old country, that has made her a target for desinformatsiya efforts centered upon her maternal grandfather's role in local media as dictacted by the Nazi regime in Germany during World War II. There are two opinion pieces, one by Paul Wells for the Toronto Star and another by Michael Harris for iPolitics, that frame some of my thinking on the matter.

The situations each of them are now facing will change - at times, dramatically, I expect - in the days and months ahead. But I do believe each of them is working to rise to the challenges of these moments.
dewline: (Default)
...of my very disorganized personal library, I rediscovered my copy of Naomi Klein's Shock Doctrine. I suspected as much, and my memory didn't betray me. Chapters 11 and 12 are devoted to what might be called an inquest or autopsy into some of the other root causes of Grazhdanin Putin's rise to political dominance in Moskva.

And from there, I think I'll spend part of the afternoon watching Agents of SHIELD as I catch up on my e-mail.

More on other matters as the day wears on.
dewline: (Default)
The first place that ever sold me Mac gear was the Mac Group. Back then, they were a second-story walkup in an office building off of Gladstone, near the city's traffic management centre and the O-Train tracks. I still have that machine.

They're apparently gone now. Three moves later, and the website's gone, the phone number is "this cellular number is currently unassigned" and their Facebook page has been left fallow for two years, apparently.

Last I visited them, they were in a second-story walk-up off of Nelson near the Rideau Library.

I miss them.
dewline: (Default)
Planning to watch Hidden Figures at the cinema tonight. Not for nostalgia, but to learn something I didn't know before about who helped build what we now have in the worlds we (hope to) live on.
dewline: (public broadcasting)
So...back when I went to animation school, the college had a lab attached to it stocked with Commodore Amiga 2000 machines as its workhorses of choice. They had what was then a full suite of software tailored to the work we were doing. Scanning, clean-up of the artwork, scriptwriting, and so on...we could do just about everything that could be done with computers in animation back then on those machines. Having Commodore go to pieces two years after I graduated didn't help much, so I found myself staying with the office work and courtroom art contracts I'd fallen into to pay the bills of the moment.

So I find this article on Ars Technica today. I am both pleased to see the operating system and new machines using continuing today...and sorry that I wasn't able to get into being part of the continuing user base back then.
dewline: (investigation)
They're not a thing I think about very often, so finding out that the oldest-surviving such business may be shutting down was a bit of a surprise. The Globe and Mail's Paul Waldie interviews the current management of Whitechapel Bell Foundry on the matter of those plans, the firm's history and technologies, and where that industry might be headed.
dewline: (education)
Randy links to a tale of quieter heroes...

Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] rfmcdpei at [URBAN NOTE] "How construction barriers are bringing downtown's gritty past to life"
CBC News' Lorenda Reddekopp looks at how archeologists are uncovering the history of Toronto's infamous Ward, a neighbourhood that was an early center for immigration.

Mavis Garland clearly remembers the sign stuck in the window of her stepdad's barbershop: "No Discrimination."

That was back in the early 1950s. Garland's mother, a white woman and British immigrant, made the sign. Her Chinese stepfather wanted clients of all races to know they were welcome.

Garland says it worked.

Her family's story is one of six depicted in an art project — called Picturing The Ward — on the wooden construction hoardings surrounding what will eventually be a new courthouse in downtown Toronto, at 11 Centre Ave., northwest of city hall.

The street art covers two blocks, recounting life stories from the gritty, impoverished area that used to be known as "The Ward." It was a first home for new immigrants to the city dating back to the 1800s.
dewline: (Grief)
Geneviève Bergeron (born 1968), civil engineering student
Hélène Colgan (born 1966), mechanical engineering student
Nathalie Croteau (born 1966), mechanical engineering student
Barbara Daigneault (born 1967), mechanical engineering student
Anne-Marie Edward (born 1968), chemical engineering student
Maud Haviernick (born 1960), materials engineering student
Maryse Laganière (born 1964), budget clerk in the École Polytechnique's finance department
Maryse Leclair (born 1966), materials engineering student
Anne-Marie Lemay (born 1967), mechanical engineering student
Sonia Pelletier (born 1961), mechanical engineering student
Michèle Richard (born 1968), materials engineering student
Annie St-Arneault (born 1966), mechanical engineering student
Annie Turcotte (born 1969), materials engineering student
Barbara Klucznik-Widajewicz (born 1958), nursing student

May we never forget.
dewline: (Sketching)
Let that baseball team rebrand themselves as the Capes.

Why?

Because that city is where Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster first created the Superman franchise in its earliest form.

"The Cleveland Capes".

How does it sound?

Profile

dewline: (Default)
On the DEWLine 2.0: Dwight Williams

July 2017

S M T W T F S
       1
2 3 45 67 8
9 10 111213 1415
1617 18 192021 22
23242526272829
3031     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 27th, 2017 06:53 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios